Posted:02 Mar 2010

Do social entrepreneurs exist in China?

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“Do social entrepreneurs exist in China? If so, who are they?” The answer to the first question is a resounding YES, and these questions led to the idea to put together a book, the first of its kind to introduce the exciting development of social entrepreneurship in China.

The book features ten stories that cover 13 social entrepreneurs. They came from very different backgrounds: ‘China Rabbit King’, REN Xuping, left school when he was just 14 years old because of poverty; the two young founders of Venture in Development, Marie and Carol, first got to know ‘social entrepreneurism’ at the Kennedy School in Harvard; the founders of Wu Qi Training School, 1kg More and Love Farms were once urban white-collar workers; LV Zhao (founder of NPI) and SHEN Dongshu (CEO of Fu Ping) were very successful businessmen before they decided to devote themselves to the nonprofit world.

However, these stories also reveal important commonalities. First, they all address some of the most crucial issues that a growing China now faces: income gaps and poverty, environment-friendly agriculture, education quality in rural and isolated areas, job training and livelihood support for migrant workers in the cities. Their approaches to solving these difficult problems are innovative and daring; they all are devoted to their work and are ready to learn from past failures to better prepare themselves for future success. Sustainability is their motto and they are good at mobilizing and regenerating resources just as the business world is. They pay a great deal of attention to cross-sector collaboration and networking. Most of the time they are like the ‘thousand-hand buddha’: they identify and motivate friends and partners in government, and business enterprises, donors and volunteers, and maximise the use of the resources that they can lay their hands on.

Let them be the single sparks that will eventually light up the prairie!

Table of Contents

• The Magic of Hua Dan, Caroline Watson 花旦工作室

• Exploring New Way of Poverty Alleviation, Shen Dongshu 富平學校

• The First Non-profit Incubator in China, Lu Zhao 公益組織發展中心

• The Legend of Rabbit King, Ren Xuping 中國兔子王

• Sightseeing + Volunteering = Social Change, Yu Zhihai 多背一公斤

• Building up Professionalism for Domestic Helpers, Huang Qijun 妙心家政

• Conserving Traditional Farming in Rural Guangxi, Zhou Jinzhang 柳州愛農會

• Equipping Migrant Workers for Career Progression, Zhang Fang 五齊人文職業培訓學校

• Yaks and Reducing Rural Poverty, Marie So and Carol Chyau 犛牛扶貧

• Bringing Living Knowledge to Rural China, Philip Hui 活知識社會企業

This newly published volume is available for only US$10 each. To purchase a copy, please contact Fan at fanli@glinet.org.

“Do social entrepreneurs exist in China? If so, who are they?” The answer to the first question is a resounding YES, and these questions led to the idea to put together this book, the first of its kind to introduce the exciting development of social entrepreneurship in China.The book features ten stories that cover 13 social entrepreneurs. They came from very different backgrounds: ‘China Rabbit King’, REN Xuping, left school when he was just 14 years old because of poverty; the two young founders of Venture in Development, Marie and Carol, first got to know ‘social entrepreneurism’ at the Kennedy School in Harvard; the founders of Wu Qi Training School, 1kg More and Love Farms were once urban white-collar workers; LV Zhao (founder of NPI) and SHEN Dongshu (CEO of Fu Ping) were very successful businessmen before they decided to devote themselves to the nonprofit world.However, these stories also reveal important commonalities. First, they all address some of the most crucial issues that a growing China now faces: income gaps and poverty, environment-friendly agriculture, education quality in rural and isolated areas, job training and livelihood support for migrant workers in the cities. Their approaches to solving these difficult problems are innovative and daring; they all are devoted to their work and are ready to learn from past failures to better prepare themselves for future success. Sustainability is their motto and they are good at mobilizing and regenerating resources just as the business world is. They pay a great deal of attention to cross-sector collaboration and networking. Most of the time they are like the ‘thousand-hand buddha’: they identify and motivate friends and partners in government, and business enterprises, donors and volunteers, and maximise the use of the resources that they can lay their hands on.Let them be the single sparks that will eventually light up the prairie!Table of Contents• The Magic of Hua Dan, Caroline Watson  花旦工作室• Exploring New Way of Poverty Alleviation, Shen Dongshu  富平學校• The First Non-profit Incubator in China, Lu Zhao  公益組織發展中心• The Legend of Rabbit King, Ren Xuping  中國兔子王• Sightseeing + Volunteering = Social Change, Yu Zhihai  多背一公斤• Building up Professionalism for Domestic Helpers, Huang Qijun  妙心家政• Conserving Traditional Farming in Rural Guangxi, Zhou Jinzhang  柳州愛農會• Equipping Migrant Workers for Career Progression, Zhang Fang  五齊人文職業培訓學校• Yaks and Reducing Rural Poverty, Marie So and Carol Chyau  犛牛扶貧• Bringing Living Knowledge to Rural China, Philip Hui  活知識社會企業This newly published volume is available for only US$10 each. To purchase a copy, please contact Fan at fanli@glinet.org.
“Do social entrepreneurs exist in China? If so, who are they?” The answer to the first question is a resounding YES, and these questions led to the idea to put together this book, the first of its kind to introduce the exciting development of social entrepreneurship in China.
The book features ten stories that cover 13 social entrepreneurs. They came from very different backgrounds: ‘China Rabbit King’, REN Xuping, left school when he was just 14 years old because of poverty; the two young founders of Venture in Development, Marie and Carol, first got to know ‘social entrepreneurism’ at the Kennedy School in Harvard; the founders of Wu Qi Training School, 1kg More and Love Farms were once urban white-collar workers; LV Zhao (founder of NPI) and SHEN Dongshu (CEO of Fu Ping) were very successful businessmen before they decided to devote themselves to the nonprofit world.
However, these stories also reveal important commonalities. First, they all address some of the most crucial issues that a growing China now faces: income gaps and poverty, environment-friendly agriculture, education quality in rural and isolated areas, job training and livelihood support for migrant workers in the cities. Their approaches to solving these difficult problems are innovative and daring; they all are devoted to their work and are ready to learn from past failures to better prepare themselves for future success. Sustainability is their motto and they are good at mobilizing and regenerating resources just as the business world is. They pay a great deal of attention to cross-sector collaboration and networking. Most of the time they are like the ‘thousand-hand buddha’: they identify and motivate friends and partners in government, and business enterprises, donors and volunteers, and maximise the use of the resources that they can lay their hands on.
Let them be the single sparks that will eventually light up the prairie!
Table of Contents
• The Magic of Hua Dan, Caroline Watson  花旦工作室
• Exploring New Way of Poverty Alleviation, Shen Dongshu  富平學校
• The First Non-profit Incubator in China, Lu Zhao  公益組織發展中心
• The Legend of Rabbit King, Ren Xuping  中國兔子王
• Sightseeing + Volunteering = Social Change, Yu Zhihai  多背一公斤
• Building up Professionalism for Domestic Helpers, Huang Qijun  妙心家政
• Conserving Traditional Farming in Rural Guangxi, Zhou Jinzhang  柳州愛農會
• Equipping Migrant Workers for Career Progression, Zhang Fang  五齊人文職業培訓學校
• Yaks and Reducing Rural Poverty, Marie So and Carol Chyau  犛牛扶貧
• Bringing Living Knowledge to Rural China, Philip Hui  活知識社會企業
This newly published volume is available for only US$10 each. To purchase a copy, please contact Fan at fanli@glinet.org.

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